Strategic Objective 1.1:  Promote affordable healthcare, while balancing spending on premiums, deductibles, and out-of-pocket costs

Strategic Objective 1.1:  Promote affordable healthcare, while balancing spending on premiums, deductibles, and out-of-pocket costs

Affordability is a key component of accessible healthcare. For individuals and families, high costs of care create economic strain. Americans often have to choose between spending a higher proportion of wages on healthcare and paying for other household essentials. Without timely access to healthcare services, Americans risk worsening healthcare outcomes and higher costs. Yet for many, costs make healthcare out of reach.

In 2016, the Federal Government accounted for 28 percent of&nbsp sphere magnets HS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs sphere magnets HS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs magnet ring HS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs ring magnet HS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs healing magnets HS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs magnet hook HS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs magnet hooks HS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs magnetic hook HS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs ring magnets percent; and State and local governments, 17 percent. National Health Expenditure data show that growth in spending is due to expanded coverage and increased utilization of healthcare.

HHS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs.

HHS is providing guidance, resources, and flexibility for States to enable them to construct competitive, affordable insurance options that best meet the needs of their citizens.

Through the Quality Payment Program authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (Pub. L. 114–10), the Department has new ways to provide incentives to pay physicians and other practitioners for providing cost-effective, high-quality care to Medicare beneficiaries, and to provide incentives for physicians to participate in alternative payment models, which reward value over volume. HHS tests and evaluates alternative payment models that bring together private payers, healthcare providers, State partners, consumer groups, beneficiaries, and others. These models aim to reduce costs and improve the quality of care for beneficiaries, including those in at-risk populations. In 2016, data on 245.4 million people, representing 84 percent of the publicly and commercially insured population in the United States, revealed that 57 percent of healthcare spending occurred within some payment structure tied to quality, including care coordination, pay-for-performance, or shared savings. Data and evidence from these innovative models are used to inform State and Federal policymakers of the methodologies that work to reduce healthcare costs and improve quality.

Contributing Operating Divisions and Staff Divisions

AHRQ, CMS, and FDA

Strategies

In 2016, the average household experienced increases in healthcare spending of 6.2 percent, primarily due to increased health insurance expenditures. Out-of-pocket spending – PDF grew 2.6 percent, physician and clinical services expenditures grew 6.3 percent, and prescription drug spending increased 9.0 percent. The Department is promoting higher-value and lower-cost healthcare options through the following strategies:

  • Promote the use of high-quality, lower-cost healthcare providers, such as community health workers and community organizations, where appropriate
  • Promote better coordination and efficiency in post-acute care by discharging patients to appropriate settings, including home and community-based services and skilled nursing facilities, using site-neutral payment rates

Prescription drug spending growth is projected to grow – PDF an average of 6.3 percent per year through 2025. Spending growth – PDF is attributed to increased spending on new medicine, price growth for existing brand-name drugs, and fewer expensive drugs going off patent. The Department is working to promote greater affordability of prescription drugs through the following strategies:

Strategic Objective 1.1:  Promote affordable healthcare, while balancing spending on premiums, deductibles, and out-of-pocket costs

Affordability is a key component of accessible healthcare. For individuals and families, high costs of care create economic strain. Americans often have to choose between spending a higher proportion of wages on healthcare and paying for other household essentials. Without timely access to healthcare services, Americans risk worsening healthcare outcomes and higher costs. Yet for many, costs make healthcare out of reach.

In 2016, the Federal Government accounted for 28 percent of healthcare spending – PDF; households, 28 percent; private businesses, 20 percent; and State and local governments, 17 percent. National Health Expenditure data show that growth in spending is due to expanded coverage and increased utilization of healthcare.

HHS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs.

HHS is providing guidance, resources, and flexibility for States to enable them to construct competitive, affordable insurance options that best meet the needs of their citizens.

Through the Quality Payment Program authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (Pub. L. 114–10), the Department has new ways to provide incentives to pay physicians and other practitioners for providing cost-effective, high-quality care to Medicare beneficiaries, and to provide incentives for physicians to participate in alternative payment models, which reward value over volume. HHS tests and evaluates alternative payment models that bring together private payers, healthcare providers, State partners, consumer groups, beneficiaries, and others. These models aim to reduce costs and improve the quality of care for beneficiaries, including those in at-risk populations. In 2016, data on 245.4 million people, representing 84 percent of the publicly and commercially insured population in the United States, revealed that 57 percent of healthcare spending occurred within some payment structure tied to quality, including care coordination, pay-for-performance, or shared savings. Data and evidence from these innovative models are used to inform State and Federal policymakers of the methodologies that work to reduce healthcare costs and improve quality.

Contributing Operating Divisions and Staff Divisions

AHRQ, CMS, and FDA

Strategies

In 2016, the average household experienced increases in healthcare spending of 6.2 percent, primarily due to increased health insurance expenditures. Out-of-pocket spending – PDF grew 2.6 percent, physician and clinical services expenditures grew 6.3 percent, and prescription drug spending increased 9.0 percent. The Department is promoting higher-value and lower-cost healthcare options through the following strategies:

  • Promote the use of high-quality, lower-cost healthcare providers, such as community health workers and community organizations, where appropriate
  • Promote better coordination and efficiency in post-acute care by discharging patients to appropriate settings, including home and community-based services and skilled nursing facilities, using site-neutral payment rates

Prescription drug spending growth is projected to grow – PDF an average of 6.3 percent per year through 2025. Spending growth – PDF is attributed to increased spending on new medicine, price growth for existing brand-name drugs, and fewer expensive drugs going off patent. The Department is working to promote greater affordability of prescription drugs through the following strategies:

Affordability is a key component of accessible healthcare. For individuals and families, high costs of care create economic strain. Americans often have to choose between spending a higher proportion of wages on healthcare and paying for other household essentials. Without timely access to healthcare services, Americans risk worsening healthcare outcomes and higher costs. Yet for many, costs make healthcare out of reach.

In 2016, the Federal Government accounted for 28 percent of healthcare spending – PDF; households, 28 percent; private businesses, 20 percent; and State and local governments, 17 percent. National Health Expenditure data show that growth in spending is due to expanded coverage and increased utilization of healthcare.

HHS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs.

HHS is providing guidance, resources, and flexibility for States to enable them to construct competitive, affordable insurance options that best meet the needs of their citizens.

Through the Quality Payment Program authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (Pub. L. 114–10), the Department has new ways to provide incentives to pay physicians and other practitioners for providing cost-effective, high-quality care to Medicare beneficiaries, and to provide incentives for physicians to participate in alternative payment models, which reward value over volume. HHS tests and evaluates alternative payment models that bring together private payers, healthcare providers, State partners, consumer groups, beneficiaries, and others. These models aim to reduce costs and improve the quality of care for beneficiaries, including those in at-risk populations. In 2016, data on 245.4 million people, representing 84 percent of the publicly and commercially insured population in the United States, revealed that 57 percent of healthcare spending occurred within some payment structure tied to quality, including care coordination, pay-for-performance, or shared savings. Data and evidence from these innovative models are used to inform State and Federal policymakers of the methodologies that work to reduce healthcare costs and improve quality.

Contributing Operating Divisions and Staff Divisions

AHRQ, CMS, and FDA

Strategies

n 2016, the average household experienced increases in healthcare spending of 6.2 percent, primarily due to increased health insurance expenditures. Out-of-pocket spending – PDF grew 2.6 percent, physician and clinical services expenditures grew 6.3 percent, and prescription drug spending increased 9.0 percent. The Department is promoting higher-value and lower-cost healthcare options through the following strategies:

  • Promote the use of high-quality, lower-cost healthcare providers, such as community health workers and community organizations, where appropriate
  • Promote better coordination and efficiency in post-acute care by discharging patients to appropriate settings, including home and community-based services and skilled nursing facilities, using site-neutral payment rates

Prescription drug spending growth is projected to grow – PDF an average of 6.3 percent per year through 2025. Spending growth – PDF is attributed to increased spending on new medicine, price growth for existing brand-name drugs, and fewer expensive drugs going off patent. The Department is working to promote greater affordability of prescription drugs through the fo

Strategic Objective 1.1:  Promote affordable healthcare, while balancing spending on premiums, deductibles, and out-of-pocket costs

Affordability is a key component of accessible healthcare. For individuals and families, high costs of care create economic strain. Americans often have to choose between spending a higher proportion of wages on healthcare and paying for other household essentials. Without timely access to healthcare services, Americans risk worsening healthcare outcomes and higher costs. Yet for many, costs make healthcare out of reach.

In 2016, the Federal Government accounted for 28 percent of healthcare spending – PDF; households, 28 percent; private businesses, 20 percent; and State and local governments, 17 percent. National Health Expenditure data show that growth in spending is due to expanded coverage and increased utilization of healthcare.

HHS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs.

HHS is providing guidance, resources, and flexibility for States to enable them to construct competitive, affordable insurance options that best meet the needs of their citizens.

Through the Quality Payment Program authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (Pub. L. 114–10), the Department has new ways to provide incentives to pay physicians and other practitioners for providing cost-effective, high-quality care to Medicare beneficiaries, and to provide incentives for physicians to participate in alternative payment models, which reward value over volume. HHS tests and evaluates alternative payment models that bring together private payers, healthcare providers, State partners, consumer groups, beneficiaries, and others. These models aim to reduce costs and improve the quality of care for beneficiaries, including those in at-risk populations. In 2016, data on 245.4 million people, representing 84 percent of the publicly and commercially insured population in the United States, revealed that 57 percent of healthcare spending occurred within some payment structure tied to quality, including care coordination, pay-for-performance, or shared savings. Data and evidence from these innovative models are used to inform State and Federal policymakers of the methodologies that work to reduce healthcare costs and improve quality.

Contributing Operating Divisions and Staff Divisions

AHRQ, CMS, and FDA

Strategies

In 2016, the average household experienced increases in healthcare spending of 6.2 percent, primarily due to increased health insurance expenditures. Out-of-pocket spending – PDF grew 2.6 percent, physician and clinical services expenditures grew 6.3 percent, and prescription drug spending increased 9.0 percent. The Department is promoting higher-value and lower-cost healthcare options through the following strategies:

  • Promote the use of high-quality, lower-cost healthcare providers, such as community health workers and community organizations, where appropriate
  • Promote better coordination and efficiency in post-acute care by discharging patients to appropriate settings, including home and community-based services and skilled nursing facilities, using site-neutral payment rates

Prescription drug spending growth is projected to grow – PDF an average of 6.3 percent per year through 2025. Sp

Strategic Objective 1.1:  Promote affordable healthcare, while balancing spending on premiums, deductibles, and out-of-pocket costs

Affordability is a key component of accessible healthcare. For individuals and families, high costs of care create economic strain. Americans often have to choose between spending a higher proportion of wages on healthcare and paying for other household essentials. Without timely access to healthcare services, Americans risk worsening healthcare outcomes and higher costs. Yet for many, costs make healthcare out of reach.

In 2016, the Federal Government accounted for 28 percent of healthcare spending – PDF; households, 28 percent; private businesses, 20 percent; and State and local governments, 17 percent. National Health Expenditure data show that growth in spending is due to expanded coverage and increased utilization of healthcare.

HHS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs.

HHS is providing guidance, resources, and flexibility for States to enable them to construct competitive, affordable insurance options that best meet the needs of their citizens.

Through the Quality Payment Program authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (Pub. L. 114–10), the Department has new ways to provide incentives to pay physicians and other practitioners for providing cost-effective, high-quality care to Medicare beneficiaries, and to provide incentives for physicians to participate in alternative payment models, which reward value over volume. HHS tests and evaluates alternative payment models that bring together private payers, healthcare providers, State partners, consumer groups, beneficiaries, and others. These models aim to reduce costs and improve the quality of care for beneficiaries, including those in at-risk populations. In 2016, data on 245.4 million people, representing 84 percent of the publicly and commercially insured population in the United States, revealed that 57 percent of healthcare spending occurred within some payment structure tied to quality, including care coordination, pay-for-performance, or shared savings. Data and evidence from these innovative models are used to inform State and Federal policymakers of the methodologies that work to reduce healthcare costs and improve quality.

Contributing Operating Divisions and Staff Divisions

AHRQ, CMS, and FDA

Strategies

In 2016, the average household experienced increases in healthcare spending of 6.2 percent, primarily due to increased health insurance expenditures. Out-of-pocket spending – PDF grew 2.6 percent, physician and clinical services expenditures grew 6.3 percent, and prescription drug spending increased 9.0 percent. The Department is promoting higher-value and lower-cost healthcare options through the following strategies:

  • Promote the use of high-quality, lower-cost healthcare providers, such as community health workers and community organizations, where appropriate
  • Promote better coordination and efficiency in post-acute care by discharging patients to appropriate settings, including home and community-based services and skilled nursing facilities, using site-neutral payment rates

Prescription drug spending growth is projected to grow – PDF an average of 6.3 percent per year through 2025. Spending growth – PDF is attributed to increase

Strategic Objective 1.1:  Promote affordable healthcare, while balancing spending on premiums, deductibles, and out-of-pocket costs

Affordability is a key component of accessible healthcare. For individuals and families, high costs of care create economic strain. Americans often have to choose between spending a higher proportion of wages on healthcare and paying for other household essentials. Without timely access to healthcare services, Americans risk worsening healthcare outcomes and higher costs. Yet for many, costs make healthcare out of reach.

In 2016, the Federal Government accounted for 28 percent of healthcare spending – PDF; households, 28 percent; private businesses, 20 percent; and State and local governments, 17 percent. National Health Expenditure data show that growth in spending is due to expanded coverage and increased utilization of healthcare.

HHS is committed to lowering healthcare costs for Americans to affordable levels and minimizing the burden of government healthcare spending. By increasing consumer information, offering lower-cost options and innovation in payment and service delivery models, and promoting preventive care and market competition, HHS is working with its partners to reduce the burden of higher healthcare costs.

HHS is providing guidance, resources, and flexibility for States to enable them to construct competitive, affordable insurance options that best meet the needs of their citizens.

Through the Quality Payment Program authorized by the Medicare Access and CHIP Reauthorization Act of 2015 (Pub. L. 114–10), the Department has new ways to provide incentives to pay physicians and other practitioners for providing cost-effective, high-quality care to Medicare beneficiaries, and to provide incentives for physicians to participate in alternative payment models, which reward value over volume. HHS tests and evaluates alternative payment models that bring together private payers, healthcare providers, State partners, consumer groups, beneficiaries, and others. These models aim to reduce costs and improve the quality of care for beneficiaries, including those in at-risk populations. In 2016, data on 245.4 million people, representing 84 percent of the publicly and commercially insured population in the United States, revealed that 57 percent of healthcare spending occurred within some payment structure tied to quality, including care coordination, pay-for-performance, or shared savings. Data and evidence from these innovative models are used to inform State and Federal policymakers of the methodologies that work to reduce healthcare costs and improve quality.

Contributing Operating Divisions and Staff Divisions

AHRQ, CMS, and FDA

Strategies

In 2016, the average household experienced increases in healthcare spending of 6.2 percent, primarily due to increased health insurance expenditures. Out-of-pocket spending – PDF grew 2.6 percent, physician and clinical services expenditures grew 6.3 percent, and prescription drug spending increased 9.0 percent. The Department is promoting higher-value and lower-cost healthcare options through the following strategies:

  • Promote the use of high-quality, lower-cost healthcare providers, such as community health workers and community organizations, where appropriate
  • Promote better coordination and efficiency in post-acute care by discharging patients to appropriate settings, including home and community-based services and skilled nursing facilities, using site-neutral payment rates

Prescription drug spending growth is projected to grow – PDF an average of 6.3 percent per year through 2025. Spending growth – PDF is attributed to increased spending on new medicine, price growth for existing brand-name drugs, and fewer expensive drugs going off patent. The Department is working to promote greater affordability of prescription drugs through the following strategies:

d spending on new medicine, price growth for existing brand-name drugs, and fewer expensive drugs going off patent. The Department is working to promote greater affordability of prescription drugs through the following strategies:

ending growth – PDF is attributed to increased spending on new medicine, price growth for existing brand-name drugs, and fewer expensive drugs going off patent. The Department is working to promote greater affordability of prescription drugs through the following strategies:

llowing strategies:

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